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Tuinpaviljoen Huis Zegenwerp

podium voor het panorama

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2013 – 2015

Overdekte zit en haardhout opslag

Sint-Michielsgestel, Nederland
2013 – 2015

Hier een samenvatting van het project. Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipisicing elit, sed do eiusmod tempor incididunt ut labore et dolore magna aliqua. Ut enim ad minim veniam. Quis nostrud exercitation ullamco laboris nisi ut aliquip ex ea commodo consequat. Duis aute irure dolor in reprehenderit in voluptate velit esse cillum dolore eu fugiat nulla pariatur.

overdekte verblijfsruimte, podium, haardhoutopslag
Gerealiseerd
150 vierkante meter
2013 – 2015
2014 – 2015
Zegenwerp, Sint-Michielsgestel, Nederland



credits
Brabants Landschap



Superprijs
Beste project voor 2018

"As a completion of a renovated monumental mansion that lies on a former isle in the river Dommel, a timber pavilion is added to replace several small and dilapidated structures. An old stone wall forms the base for the backbone of the new building to be aligned with: a 10 meters long double-sided firewood archive, along sides of which are two gable roofs. The larger one on the inside is displaced towards the river Dommel and covers a stone terrace that rises out of the garden which goes on a slant towards the river bank. It will be used for dining, receptions and occasional musical performances. The other roof covers an informal extension of the driving way that leads up to this proverbial backdoor of the premises.
 
deBOSSA was tasked with building a contemporary pavilion that would nevertheless closely relate to the historical main building that has a protected status of national monument. Rather than doing so in terms of style, the design adopts the historical construction materials as well as the craftsmanship that needs to go with those. The timber construction is sawn out of trees that were felled from local forests that are also owned by the landlord (Brabants Landschap Foundation). All construction elements are put together with classic joinery techniques such as (half blind) dovetails, cross laps, mortise and tenon joints and bevel lap splices, secured with draw bore pins. The brickwork and paving are made up of little old yellow bricks called ‘IJsselsteentjes’ in Dutch that were recovered from a demolition site and that match the bricks of existing paving and foundations of old parts of the historical building. The roof tiles were recovered as well, providing the pavilion with a characteristic texture and an instant verdigris.
 
Opposed to these historical references was a modern minimalist approach: the structure was to be as clean and open as possible. There are no longitudinal struts for instance, blocking the view on the landscape, neither through the structure nor from within. The steel arms supporting the inverted roof of the firewood storage are very slender, just cut out of sheet, whereas the columns – two T-beams bolted together - are even archetypically modern in their reference to Mies van der Rohe. There is also a certain absence of detail; the only gutter is the actual roof of the firewood storage, transporting rain from both aligned roofs downwards through simple holes and along chains instead of pipes. The heads of the roofstructures simply show their construction, which is very plain. Because the purlines are placed at roof tile distance there are no intermediate layers, keeping a clear view on the tiles from underneath the roof as well. Lastly the timber construction got a twist; the tie rods do not cross horizontally from one column to the opposite, but they are installed zig-zag-wise with a lowered centre, made possible through a longitudinal beam hanging under the nib. This way a very delicate sense of ceiling occurs, making the rather large structure more intimate even in smaller companies. At the same time the lowered centre aims for a diverging view on the rich surroundings from underneath the canopy."

Overdekte zit en haardhout opslag

Sint-Michielsgestel, Nederland
2013 – 2015

Hier een samenvatting van het project. Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipisicing elit, sed do eiusmod tempor incididunt ut labore et dolore magna aliqua. Ut enim ad minim veniam. Quis nostrud exercitation ullamco laboris nisi ut aliquip ex ea commodo consequat. Duis aute irure dolor in reprehenderit in voluptate velit esse cillum dolore eu fugiat nulla pariatur.

"As a completion of a renovated monumental mansion that lies on a former isle in the river Dommel, a timber pavilion is added to replace several small and dilapidated structures. An old stone wall forms the base for the backbone of the new building to be aligned with: a 10 meters long double-sided firewood archive, along sides of which are two gable roofs. The larger one on the inside is displaced towards the river Dommel and covers a stone terrace that rises out of the garden which goes on a slant towards the river bank. It will be used for dining, receptions and occasional musical performances. The other roof covers an informal extension of the driving way that leads up to this proverbial backdoor of the premises.
 
deBOSSA was tasked with building a contemporary pavilion that would nevertheless closely relate to the historical main building that has a protected status of national monument. Rather than doing so in terms of style, the design adopts the historical construction materials as well as the craftsmanship that needs to go with those. The timber construction is sawn out of trees that were felled from local forests that are also owned by the landlord (Brabants Landschap Foundation). All construction elements are put together with classic joinery techniques such as (half blind) dovetails, cross laps, mortise and tenon joints and bevel lap splices, secured with draw bore pins. The brickwork and paving are made up of little old yellow bricks called ‘IJsselsteentjes’ in Dutch that were recovered from a demolition site and that match the bricks of existing paving and foundations of old parts of the historical building. The roof tiles were recovered as well, providing the pavilion with a characteristic texture and an instant verdigris.
 
Opposed to these historical references was a modern minimalist approach: the structure was to be as clean and open as possible. There are no longitudinal struts for instance, blocking the view on the landscape, neither through the structure nor from within. The steel arms supporting the inverted roof of the firewood storage are very slender, just cut out of sheet, whereas the columns – two T-beams bolted together - are even archetypically modern in their reference to Mies van der Rohe. There is also a certain absence of detail; the only gutter is the actual roof of the firewood storage, transporting rain from both aligned roofs downwards through simple holes and along chains instead of pipes. The heads of the roofstructures simply show their construction, which is very plain. Because the purlines are placed at roof tile distance there are no intermediate layers, keeping a clear view on the tiles from underneath the roof as well. Lastly the timber construction got a twist; the tie rods do not cross horizontally from one column to the opposite, but they are installed zig-zag-wise with a lowered centre, made possible through a longitudinal beam hanging under the nib. This way a very delicate sense of ceiling occurs, making the rather large structure more intimate even in smaller companies. At the same time the lowered centre aims for a diverging view on the rich surroundings from underneath the canopy."

overdekte verblijfsruimte, podium, haardhoutopslag
Gerealiseerd
150 vierkante meter
2013 – 2015
2014 – 2015
Zegenwerp, Sint-Michielsgestel, Nederland



credits
Brabants Landschap



Superprijs
Beste project voor 2018

Externe bronnen

https://inhabitat.com/a-quirky-split-level-pavilion-in-the-netherlands-built-with-fallen-trees/

Geselecteerde Projecten

2018-07-13T13:18:19+00:00